Photographing Reflections

 

Leica M6 camera and Leica 35mm f2 Summicron lens with Kodak Professional Ektachrome 100 VS film Leica M6 camera and Leica 35mm f2 Summicron-M Aspherical lens with Kodak Professional Ektachrome 100 VS film

Photographing this scene was an incredible experience. I was spending the night camping with a few photography friends at the Pink Lakes National Park in Sunset Country 70 km west of Ouyen, along the Mallee Highway, in far North West Victoria, Australia. The Pink Lakes get their name from the deep red pigment carotene that is secreted from the alga on the lakes. The pinkish hue of the lakes is strongest in late summer, particularly when viewed early or late in the day or under a white cloudy sky.

The lakes rarely hold much water and during summer it's common for the water to evaporate, resulting in salt crusts forming a series of seemingly random lines over the surface of the lake. While these lines provide an interesting design element and a way into abstraction, care should be taken when walking onto the lakebed. A heavy footfall could penetrate the surface and see you sink knee deep in mud. It's also wise not to lay your camera directly on the ground, which is caked in salt, and to thoroughly clean the outside of your camera and tripod with a damp cloth immediately after each shoot. Salt is high corrosive and on your return home, to prevent your tripod seizing up at its joints, it's a good idea to work some marine grade lubricant over the tripod. The lakes provided industry to the area with salt being commercially harvested between 1916 and 1975. Abounding with wildlife the visitor may well see Western Grey Kangaroo, Emu, Echidna and a variety of bird life. Springtime sees the emergence of lovely wildflowers.

I made the above image with a Leica M6 camera and Leica 35mm f2 Summicron lens with Kodak Professional Ektachrome 100VS film. Image processing was done in Adobe Camera RAW and Adobe Photoshop CS3.

Glenn Guy