Abstraction through Reflections

Canon G9 camera Canon G9 camera

I’m doing some work for a very good friend of mine, a doctor who needs a camera/lighting system that members of his staff can use to photograph patients both before and after certain procedures are undertaken. As the staff members in question are amateur photographers there’s no chance of using a DSLR and either portable or studio flash to achieve the desired results. Similarly RAW shooting, with the need to process the images on the computer, is not an option. The idea is to be able to produce quality images with little more than a point and shoot approach. As you can image this is quite a challenge, but progress is being made.

Prior to this job I’d probably taken no more than 6 frames on a point and shoot digital camera. I don’t own one and have never felt the need to use my mobile phone as a camera. I guess that makes me old school. While I embrace technology I still prefer to use the tool designed for the job, rather than some hybrid device. This preference may well change in years to come, but that’s where I am today. And that’s not to say I won’t pick up an i-phone and new Leica camera down the track.

So, with little or no experience using digital point and shoot cameras, I needed to spend some time orientating myself to my friends Canon G9 camera. I was working with a group of students photographing architecture in and around Federation Square in Melbourne, Australia. Several of the students commented that they were concerned about an assignment they had for another subject dealing with abstraction. It seemed to me that the guys were looking for some inspiration. And as movement is often the best way to activate both the thinking and creative process, I whipped out the Canon G9 and, within a few minutes, had motivated nearby participants to action and had produced several publishable images which I’II share over coming days. I only wished I’d shot in RAW, rather then JPEG, but that’s just one of the possible consequences of someone else messing around with your (or, in this case, your friends) camera.

The original file was processed in Adobe Lightroom 2, prior to final creative effects being applied in Adobe Photoshop CS4.

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Glenn Guy, Blue Sky Photography
Glenn Guy